The Powerful Elegance of Location-Based Advertising in Marketing Healthcare Products and Services

In today’s fast-paced medical marketing environment, location-based advertising (LBA) offers a powerful, hyper-targeted, low-cost way to generate qualified leads and improve the overall effectiveness of marketing campaigns. LBA uses native GPS-targeting technology to pinpoint prospects geographically, and then serves ad messages in-app to their mobile, tablet and desktop devices. LBA services offered by our agency include GeoFencing/Retargeting and IP Targeting, which can be used together or independently, depending on your marketing objectives.

GeoFencing/Retargeting

geo-fencing

GeoFencing is an elegant solution for marketers seeking to reach and influence physicians of all specialties, as well as their patients. Considering the difficulty reps face in obtaining face time with physicians, and the fact that so many doctors’ offices are now “rep-inaccessible,” GeoFencing puts key messages about your company right in the hands (literally!) of the people you seek to influence most.

Here’s how it works. We put a digital “fence” around each geographic area or address you wish to target…a medical office building, a hospital, a physician practice. When individuals within these locations access apps on their smart phone or tablet, your digital ads appear in-app, with a link to the landing page of your choice.

Your ads are seen by doctors, nurses, administrators and even patients sitting in waiting rooms. With retargeting, we continue to deliver your ads to these individuals long after they’ve left the targeted building, usually for a period of up to 30 days.

For equipment and medical device manufacturers, our agency leverages the power of GeoFencing/Retargeting to reach and influence clinicians and administrators at hospitals, medical centers and surgery centers—or the attendees at an influential medical conference—whether or not the manufacturer is even exhibiting!

An oncologist GeoFences competing practices to encourage a second opinion consultation. A bariatric surgeon GeoFences people within a Weight Watchers clinic. An orthopedic practice GeoFences professional and collegiate athletes within their practice facilities. The opportunities are endless!

 

IP Targeting

IP tracking

This tactic combines the power of location-based advertising with the preciseness of a qualified list of prospects. It is ideal for targeting individuals based on demographic and psychographic profiles, but without the high cost of traditional direct mail to reach them.

Once a mailing list is obtained, our technology is capable of identifying the individual IP addresses of about half of the mailing list. Then digital ad messages can be delivered to this audience on their devices again and again.

The benefit of this approach is that you can zero in on specific customer profiles and reach them for a fraction of the cost of traditional direct mail. For example, you can use this method to target individuals in your city who have diabetes. Or you can get very granular in your approach, targeting African-American women 39-54 who have purchased at least one diet product in the past 12 months and who have a household income in excess of $100,000.

The advantage of this approach over traditional SEO or pay-per-click advertising is that it does not require the individual to be actively searching specific terms or visiting specific web properties in order to be able to identify them and serve them digitally.

As with any new marketing technology, large consumer brands have already realized the power of this medium and are exploiting it prodigiously, as are attorneys and pharmaceutical companies. But with most LBA campaigns priced at $20 or less CPM (cost per thousand impressions delivered), this approach is extremely cost effective for medical marketers and results in very little waste.

For more information on Location-Based Advertising, contact Jim Koehler at (303) 623-1190 x229 or email jim@armadamedical.com.

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A Highly Personalized New Year

personalized medicineWith a predicted annual growth rate of 4.8 percent, the health and wellness industry is, in a word, healthy. However, one of the segments within health care expected to grow at more than twice the rate of the industry as a whole is a specialty known as “personalized medicine.”

 

The simple definition of personalized medicine is “the right treatment for the right person at the right time.” According to The Institute for Systems Biology co-founder Dr. Leroy Hood, there are four attributes of personalized medicine:

 

It is personalized, because it takes into account an individual’s genetic profile;

It is predictive, because it anticipates health problems and drug reactions;

It is preventive, focusing on wellness and not on disease;

It is participatory, empowering patients to take more responsibility for their health care decisions.

Personalized medicine is made possible by advances in genomic testing and proteomic science that have resulted in more highly targeted diagnostics and treatment options. Supporters of this approach cite increased efficiency of treatments, reduced instances of adverse drug reactions, elimination of unnecessary treatments and improved outcomes. As individuals become more aware of their individual risk, low-tech approaches like functional foods and nutraceuticals will also play an important role in personalized medicine.

 

In a report entitled “The new science of personalized medicine: Translating the promise into practice,” PricewaterhouseCoopers predicts:

The U.S. personalized medicine market is estimated at about $232 billion and is projected to grow 11% annually, nearly doubling in size by 2015 to over $450 billion. The core diagnostic and therapeutic segment of the market—comprised primarily of pharmaceutical, medical device and diagnostics companies—is estimated at $24 billion, and is expected to grow by 10% annually, reaching $42 billion by 2015. The personalized medical care portion of the market—including telemedicine, health information technology, and disease management services offered by traditional health and technology companies—is estimated at $4-12 billion and could grow tenfold to over $100 billion by 2015. And the related nutrition and wellness market—including retail, complementary and alternative medicine offered by consumer products, food and beverage, leisure and retail companies—is estimated at $196 billion and projected to grow by 7% annually to over $290 billion by 2015.

 

By all accounts, personalized medicine is a disruptive innovation, taking place at a time when the U.S. health care system is already undergoing many changes. As a result, there are several exciting opportunities for companies within the core B2B medical industry sector, which includes pharmaceutical, biotech and medical device companies:

  • A reduction in the time, cost, size and failure rate of clinical trials
  • The ability to command premium pricing for drugs and therapies of proven effectiveness
  • Reduced number of drugs or devices recalled due to safety concerns

 

Healthcare providers who embrace this approach will benefit as well. According to the report, “the biggest opportunity in personalized medicine may lie in identifying new products, services and information targeted directly to consumers. Success in this space will require new approaches, new relationships and new ways of thinking.”

 

How does this relate to Armada clients and their marketing challenges in 2015 and beyond?

 

I believe the trend toward personalized medicine presents excellent marketing opportunities across the spectrum of healthcare businesses:

 

Device manufacturers are able to position their technologies to specialists for greater utilization within at-risk populations. For example, an individual at risk for stroke could benefit from enhanced cerebral perfusion monitoring on everything from complex cardiovascular surgical procedures to less invasive interventional radiology or orthopedic procedures. Marketing strategies include surgical team education, pre-op patient education and payer initiatives.

Biomedical testing companies can work with primary care physicians to better identify personal risk within broader patient risk categories. For example, a test that determines the effect of aspirin resistance can lead to a more personalized approach to reducing cardiovascular risk that may result in adjusted aspirin doses or alternate medications to achieve therapeutic goals. Marketing can capitalize on this with increased physician education through direct marketing and public relations targeting print and online media read by PCPs, as well as strategic partnerships with pharmaceutical companies.

Genetic testing improves the identification of cancer risk, and genomic tumor profiling results in more targeted and potentially less toxic cancer treatment with fewer side effects. For example, a hospital or diagnostic center specializing in breast health can embrace these technologies and differentiate itself from other providers in both referring physician and direct-to-consumer marketing, such as television, print, radio and digital advertising in order to attract and maintain loyal customers.

 

These examples represent the proverbial “tip of the iceberg” in marketing opportunity, and as history has shown, adoption can be accelerated through direct-to-consumer marketing approaches—even for companies that have previously focused exclusively on provider marketing.

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How to Kick-Start an Employee Wellness Challenge

1208701_10101931161578573_1394992726_n (2)As an active and healthy Denverite, I wanted to bring forth an organized employee wellness effort into our company. Studies show that healthy employees take fewer sick days and work better overall. Starting last month, the Armada Wellness Challenge aimed to encourage healthier lifestyle behaviors among our crew and add some fun activities into our day-to-day work.

The month-long challenge featured a different goal each week:

• Week 1: Rest, Relaxation and Sleep

• Week 2: More Water, Less Caffeine and Sugar

• Week 3: Cook at Home, Pack a Lunch

• Week 4: Get Active

The greatest obstacle was to create weekly goals that were not only attainable by every employee but also fun and engaging to participate in. Weekly emails included helpful resources related to that week’s goal and stand-out employees were recognized as the week’s “Honorable Mention” via a virtual challenger board and on Armada’s social media channels.Dan Wellness Challenge

Every business can benefit from creating a short or long-term wellness challenge — it’s a win-win effort.

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Armada Medical Revamps Patient Education Program

Client: Renal Ventures Management

Project: RV CARE Patient Education Program 

Planning/Goals of the Project:

Armada Medical’s client Renal Ventures Management, the leading provider of dialysis services nationwide, is completely rewriting the standard of renal care through a series of innovative programs under the moniker RV CARE, or Renal Ventures Coaching for Actions, Results and Empowerment. Armada Medical was tasked to revamp the messaging and design of communications to be used throughout all aspects of the renal care process.

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Managing Your Online Reputation

Five star physician review

“Doctors today cannot ignore their online reputation” – Kevin Pho, M.D., social media’s leading physician voice

Feeling ill? Google your symptoms. Looking for an at-home treatment for sore back muscles? Turn to WebMD. Need to get that sinus infection checked out? Search online for the most top-rated ENT doc in your area.

It’s clear that Americans’ health-care decisions are made with the help of a PC, tablet or smart phone these days. Take a look at the stats:

  • 41 percent of consumers say Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and online forums influence their choice of a specific hospital, medical facility or doctor, according to consulting firm PwC.
  • Most Americans (54%) are going online to determine which physicians to see, what treatment to get, and what services a hospital or clinic might provide, Manhattan Research found.
  • About one in five patients go to online rating sites, says Pew Research Center.

 

Many health care companies are embracing the tools online that allow for open avenues of communication for patients. But some say they’re resistant to engaging social media for their medical practices or companies. Our response, time and time again, is:

“People are talking about you online; wouldn’t you want to be part of the conversation?”

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