And the Oscar goes to: Neurological Disease Awareness

oscars neurological diseaseAcademy Award winners often use their acceptance speeches to make us aware of causes that are near and dear to them, and this year was no exception.

In 1993, Richard Gere used the forum to bring awareness to human rights violations in Tibet. In 2009, Sean Penn used his acceptance speech to promote same-sex marriage. Perhaps the most famous example is when Marlon Brando sent a surrogate to accept the Best Actor award for his role in The Godfather in 1973. Native American civil rights activist Sacheen Littlefeather accepted the award and used the occasion to make a speech intended to bring awareness to the American Indian Movement.

But this year, the content of the nominated films and that of the acceptance speeches were very much in sync, and for the best actress and best actor award winners, the focus was on neurological disease.

In “Still Alice,” Julianne Moore plays a college professor experiencing the symptoms of early-onset Alzheimer’s disease. According to The Alzheimer’s Association, the disease affects an estimated 200,000 people in the U.S. each year, including people in their 40s and 50s.

In “The Theory of Everything,” Eddie Redmayne portrays the celebrated physicist Stephen Hawking through his younger years as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) begins to rob him of his speech and use of his body. “This Oscar belongs to all of those people around the world battling ALS,” he said during his acceptance speech.

According to The Neurological Alliance, “Neurological conditions are very poorly understood by the general public.” The FDA believes that disease awareness communications “can provide important health information to consumers and health care practitioners, and can encourage consumers to seek, and healthcare practitioners to provide, appropriate treatment. This is particularly important for under-diagnosed, under-treated conditions.”

Social media has been an important factor in the proliferation of neurologic disease awareness. Last summer’s ALS “Ice Bucket Challenge” was started as a grassroots effort that soon caught fire on social media and was then picked up by mainstream national media. This year’s Oscars had the reverse effect, beginning with a mainstream media event and then exploding on social media. For example, Julianne Moore’s acceptance speech produced 64,764 social media mentions during the broadcast, including 8,040 that mentioned Alzheimer’s specifically.

With several hundred million worldwide viewers in more than 200 countries around the world, it’s very likely that awareness of these devastating neurological diseases will continue to grow.

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Armada Medical Marketing Brings Expertise to Minnesota Conference

The Associates for Medical Imaging Management

Armada Medical Marketing will bring its expertise to the 41st Annual Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) Meeting and Exposition July 28-31 at the Minneapolis Convention Center.

Exhibiting at booth No. 126, Armada’s staff will share their expertise in developing successful, award-winning integrated marketing campaigns for hospitals, diagnostic imaging centers and radiology groups around the nation.

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Five Insights: Capitalize on a LinkedIn Company Page

Insights on Capitalizing on LinkedIn Company PagesWe recently attended the Social Media Breakfast Minneapolis-Saint Paul event (SMBMSP) and got to thinking about LinkedIn and its hidden opportunities to promote your medical device company, outpatient clinic, hospital or health care product line.

LinkedIn is a social network with over 116 million users and its offerings for the health care industry is growing at an exponential pace. And a company page allows your brand to reach your target clients, future employees, potential business partners and even consumers. Share your brand messages, specialties and services, and latest news through a successfully built LinkedIn company page. With a few simple steps you can capitalize on a LinkedIn page’s ability to promote product awareness and expand company reach. Our team compiled a handful of tactics to get you started:

1) Images are Powerful

LinkedIn recently upgraded its visual options and now allows panoramic images for your company page — similar to the banner photos on Facebook pages. Since it is the first thing a person sees when visiting your company page, choose this image wisely. Highlight an event, health awareness month, service, physician or product, and create a visually appealing cover photo that best represents the work environment. Paul DeBettignies, an IT recruiter who blogs at Minnesota Headhunter, suggests changing the banner image quarterly to gain exposure and to show up in your followers’ news feeds more often. You’ll start to see more people taking notice of your page and your brand.

Armada Medical Marketing’s LinkedIn cover photo promotes each of our social media channels and provides a “call to action” to encourage viewers to connect and follow.

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The Next Challenge for Radiology Practices: RBMA Summit

Next week’s Radiology Business Management Association Radiology Summit is in our own backyard, taking place at the historic Broadmoor in Colorado Springs. Each year, RBMA provides a great opportunity to network with radiology professionals and practice administrators and share strategies in all areas of health care marketing.

Challenges in marketing to consumers, referring physicians and current patients are ever-present for leaders in radiology. We’re seeing radiology companies struggle with online reviews, decreasing modality volume and missed opportunities to get their name and associated expertise in the news.

Armada Medical Marketing will host booth #107 at RBMA and both Jim and Jennifer are eagerly awaiting introductions, questions and case studies of how to apply strategic marketing practices in an outpatient diagnostic imaging setting. Some “hot topics” we’ve seen over the past year have allowed us to create marketing campaigns to support our clients. Take a look…

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Facts, Stats and Graphs

Imagine the Power of Imagery160939709

2012 was the year of imagery and health care marketers strategically applied visuals to a variety of social and marketing platforms. 2013 is no different. For the health care industry, graphics alone may not get the point across. Therefore, infographics are a great route for health care marketers. Infographics provide graphic visuals that present data and information.

Get the Words to Stick

With the popularity of sites such as StumbleUpon, it is clear that attention spans are diminishing with the average person leaving a page within 10 to 20 seconds. Visuals are processed 60,000 times faster than text and text is only 7 percent of daily communication. That is not to say text is completely obsolete. Words play a major role in describing abstract ideas and conveying a specific message, which is important for health care marketing. But words are supplemental to visuals, which can help grasp a reader’s attention.

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Managing Your Online Reputation

Five star physician review

“Doctors today cannot ignore their online reputation” – Kevin Pho, M.D., social media’s leading physician voice

Feeling ill? Google your symptoms. Looking for an at-home treatment for sore back muscles? Turn to WebMD. Need to get that sinus infection checked out? Search online for the most top-rated ENT doc in your area.

It’s clear that Americans’ health-care decisions are made with the help of a PC, tablet or smart phone these days. Take a look at the stats:

  • 41 percent of consumers say Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and online forums influence their choice of a specific hospital, medical facility or doctor, according to consulting firm PwC.
  • Most Americans (54%) are going online to determine which physicians to see, what treatment to get, and what services a hospital or clinic might provide, Manhattan Research found.
  • About one in five patients go to online rating sites, says Pew Research Center.

 

Many health care companies are embracing the tools online that allow for open avenues of communication for patients. But some say they’re resistant to engaging social media for their medical practices or companies. Our response, time and time again, is:

“People are talking about you online; wouldn’t you want to be part of the conversation?”

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